EPE'21 ECCE Europe: Keynotes

Reliability of Modern Power Electronic based Power Systems

Prof. Dr. Ir. Frede BLAABJERG
Department of Energy Technology
Aalborg University, Denmark

Abstract:

Electrification is one of the pragmatic solutions for decarbonization and making a greener society. Renewable energy generations, electric transportation systems, smart- and micro-grid technologies, as well as digitalization are essential parts of sustainable electric networks. Power Electronics paly an underpinning role in the energy conversion process of these technologies. However, power electronics might be a frequent source of failure and may cause unplanned downtime and costs in the case of inappropriate design and operation. This is due to the fact that power electronic converters may introduce static challenges associated with their hardware and electro-thermal characteristics as well as dynamic issues in relation with the electro-magnetic and electro-mechanical interactions. This talk will present the challenges and address the latest advanced approaches for system-level, model-based reliable design and operation of future power electronic based power systems.

Power Electronics – A Key Enabling Technology to realize the Green Deal

Prof. Dr. Ir. Rik DE DONCKER
RWTH Aachen University
E.ON Energy Research Center & Research Campus Flexible Networks
Aachen, Germany

Abstract:

Awareness of global climate change due to the high consumption of fossil fuels has stimulated worldwide research and innovation towards a CO2-free energy supply. To realize this energy transformation innovation is required not only on the power generation, energy storage and the consumption side, but also, more importantly on the energy distribution infrastructure. In all these sectors, power electronic energy conversion systems are needed. The presentation will focus on power electronic solutions for flexible electrical grid infrastructure, in particular on DC technologies that better serve wind farms, PV systems, factories, building heating and cooling systems and fast charging infrastructure in the urban environment.

The future of e-mobility

Prof. Dr. Ir. Joeri VAN MIERLO
Director of MOBI – Mobility, Logistics and Automotive technology research centre
Head of ETEC – Department of Electrical Engineering and Energy Technology
Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium

Abstract:

It is an exciting period of time, where the transition towards a more sustainable mobility via the introduction of electric vehicles is taking place. What are the benefits and barriers for the e-mobility developments? Driving range, charging infrastructure availability and especially cost are perceived as important barriers for the market take-up of electric vehicles. Driving range is defined by o.a. battery performance. The challenge of infrastructure lies in the return on investment (chicken and egg problem). And the cost will evolve by technological improvement, market take-up and in the mean time policy support.

The purchase price of electric vehicles is currently higher than of conventional vehicles, however the driving cost is lower. Based on a Total Cost of ownership (TCO) different vehicle technologies can be compared. Results are strongly depending on the market segment assessed as well as on the incentives put forward by the legislation.

How to compare the environmental performance of different vehicle technologies? Vehicles with lower tailpipe emissions are perceived as cleaner. However, does it make sense to look only to tailpipe emissions? Limiting the comparison only to these emissions denies the fact that there are emissions involved during the production of a fuel. Would it be enough to combine fuel production and tailpipe emissions? Especially when comparing the environmental performance of electric vehicle technologies, the emissions during production of the specific components and their appropriate end-of-life treatment processes should also be taken into account. Therefore, the complete life cycle (LCA) of the vehicle should be included in order to avoid problem shifting from one life stage to another.

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